Dr. Pentecost first taught me the life of Christ in such a way that my Bible became one book and not just two Testaments; I’ll never forget the moment that clicked. I’ll treasure the personal conversations I had with him.

After I gave him a copy of my book, Walking in the Footsteps of Jesus, he called me a few weeks later to tell me how much he enjoyed the book and planned to require it as a textbook for his class, “The Life of Christ on Earth.” I was completely surprised and tremendously honored.

When I visited David Ben Gurion’s modest home in the Negev of Israel, I noticed in his vast library a surprising volume: Things to Come, by J. Dwight Pentecost.

Visit Dr. Pentecost’s memorial page on the Dallas Theological Seminary Web site. The video was also produced by DTS.

Tell me what you think: Did you know Dr. P? To leave a comment, just click here.

Why We Should Remember the Holocaust Today

Today always amazes me. At ten o’clock on this holiday each April, sirens ring loud in Israel. People stop—wherever they are, whatever they are doing—and stand at attention for 120 seconds of silence.

Imagine that for a moment. Two minutes. Silence. Everywhere.

Memorial

(Photo: Janusz Korczak Memorial at Yad Vashem honors one who sheltered Jewish children during the holocaust)

Then the sirens rang again, and life resumed—full-speed. This annual pause allows the nation to remember the six million Jews who were murdered simply because they were Jews.

Yom Hashoah, known as Holocaust Martyrs’ and Heroes’ Remembrance Day, marks the Jewish holiday that remembers those who perished in the Holocaust.

Many times I have visited Jerusalem’s Holocaust Museum, Yad Vashem.

It changes you.

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It’s Your Turn to Talk to Me

Usually I talk to you. But today, it’s your turn. For you who subscribe to my blog, my posts conveniently show up in your inbox 3 times a week. Just for today, I’d like to hear from you.

It's Your Turn to Talk to Me

(Photo by Photodune)

In the comments section below, I’m asking you to leave me a message.

Here are a few ideas:

  • Tell me your favorite place in the Holy Land (and why).
  • Tell me what book(s) you’re reading right now.
  • Ask me a (serious) question about the Bible.
  • What’s the best book or author you’ve read? (Other than the Bible.)
  • Send me a link to your blog, church, or website and tell me about it.
  • Who is your favorite speaker or preacher—and why?
  • Or anything else!

Hey, you may have read my blog for a long time but never connected with me.

I’d love to hear from you. (Yes, you!)

To leave a comment, just click here.

How to Serve God When Nobody Notices

Sometimes it’s tough to serve God in the shadows. You show up faithfully. You contribute your part, but no one seems to notice. Matthias may have felt that way.

How to Serve God When Nobody Notices

(Photo: The Jordan River. Courtesy of the Pictorial Library of Bible Lands)

Ever since John the Baptist had prepared the way for the Messiah, Matthias had followed.

  • He had walked in Jesus’ footsteps from the Jordan River to the rugged hills of Galilee.
  • He had followed the Savior with passion and persuasion.

But without recognition. Matthias was a willing unknown.

In those moments we beg God to rescue us from our insignificant lives, believing nothing important is happening with us, Matthias reminds us that just the opposite is true.

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Was Judas Saved?

His name is a byword for betrayal. But it never began that way. “Judas” is the Greek form for the Hebrew name Judah—a common designation in ancient Israel.

Was Judas Saved

(Painting: “The Judas Kiss” by Gustave Doré, Public Domain, via Wikimedia)

Judas’s treacherous betrayal came as a complete shock to all who knew him. On the surface, he appeared as dedicated as all the other apostles.

  • Chosen by Jesus.
  • Worker of miracles.
  • Even entrusted as treasurer.

So when Jesus foretold His betrayal at the Last Supper, no disciple at the table pointed and said, “Aha, Judas! I knew there was something about you!” The whole group remained clueless. Each one, in fact, asked, “Surely not I, Lord?” (Matthew 26:22).

Strangely, even Judas asked. Don’t you wonder why?

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Places of the Passion Week in 360-Degrees

Between Palm Sunday and Easter Sunday Jesus spent every day in Jerusalem. The places of the Passion Week where He taught, died, and rose again are now traveled by Christian pilgrims.

Places of the Passion Week in 360-Degrees

(Photo: Sunrise over Jerusalem. Courtesy of the Pictorial Library of Bible Lands)

Last week I shared some 360-degree images from 11 various sites in Israel. This week I’m including some panoramic images I took from sites in Jerusalem—specifically, those that connect with the Passion Week of Jesus.

Just click on the images and drag right or left to look around!

The Mount of Olives from Dominus Flevit

Jesus began the Passion Week on Palm Sunday, descending the Mount of Olives on the back of a donkey—presenting Himself to Israel as their Messiah (Dan. 9:25; Zech. 9:9, 16; Matt. 21).

The site of the Dominus Flevit Church remembers the point where Jesus paused and wept over Jerusalem, knowing the leaders would reject Him and His offer of the kingdom.

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Where Overcoming Temptation Begins

We are more than physical creatures with physical needs. Notice in most prayer meetings that you’ll hear requests for God to help with the tangible needs. That’s fine, except it often ends there.

Where Overcoming Temptation Begins

(Photo by Photodune)

We don’t always realize how desperate our need is for truth beyond the tangible.

The trouble is, when we face temptation, our challenge is anything but physical—even when the temptation appeals to a physical needs or desires.

Overcoming temptation begins long before temptation.

Jesus shows us how.

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