4 Views of Jerusalem Every Visitor Should See

I doubt you’ll meet a person who goes to Israel without seeing Jerusalem. It’s the most important city in history, and it offers so much to see. But often, it’s seen only from this view.

4 Views of Jerusalem Every Visitor Should See

(Photo: Jerusalem from the east. Courtesy of the Pictorial Library of Bible Lands)

There are many great views of Jerusalem. Like looking at the various facets of a diamond, each direction offers a different perspective on the same city.

Here are 4 views of Jerusalem every visitor should see—from the north, south, east, and west.

Good news: 3 of the views are free.

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I look forward to teaching for 4 sessions at the Music Ministry Bible Study for the Stonebriar Community Church choir and orchestra. I’ll be teaching on “Waiting on God.”

Date: January 11, 2015—February 1, 2015
Time: (Jan. 11, 18, 25, Feb. 1) 10:45 am - 12:00 pm
Event: Music Ministry Bible Study of Stonebriar Community Church
Topic: Waiting on God
Sponsor: Music Ministry Bible Study Fellowship
Venue: Stonebriar Community Church
Location: 4801 Legendary Drive
Frisco, TX 75034
Public: Private

Take a Peek at My Book’s Final Cover

Last month I asked you to tell me which cover you liked better for my upcoming book, Waiting on God. The majority preferred the cover below, and Baker Books agreed. So this is it!

Waiting on God cover 3D

Thanks so much for your help!

Also, I’m happy to announce I sent the completed manuscript to my editor on Wednesday. Hurrah! Now the process of editing and layout begins in order to have the book ready for its release in August 2015.

Please take a moment to ask God to bless the whole process and for Him to be glorified in the lives of all who read the book. Thank you!

(By the way, I’ll be teaching on “Waiting on God with Joseph” at our Sunday School class soon. Please join us!)

So tell me: Do you like the cover? To leave a comment, just click here.

Why You Shouldn’t Recommend a Book You Haven’t Read

I once led a church small group where I had fallen behind in preparation. To buy some time, I asked each participant to purchase a certain book, read the first chapter, and we would discuss it. Big mistake.

Why You Shouldn’t Recommend a Book You Haven’t Read

(Photo by Photodune)

We sailed through the first part of the chapter until we slammed into a wall. A theological wall. This well-known author took potshots at a theological position we held as a church.

What was my mistake? I hadn’t read the book before.

Here’s what happened.

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See on Google Maps the Sites of My Upcoming Holy Land Tour

Take a little trip with me.

While Google Maps does a good job with directions to the Grand Canyon, it also works in the Holy Land where Jesus walked. I have plotted the sites of my upcoming tour of through Jesus’ life.

See on Google Maps the Sites of My Upcoming Holy Land Tour

The map shows the locations of all the sites we’ll explore on our upcoming tour to the Holy Land in October of 2016.

Just click on any site—either in the list or on the map itself—and up pops a window with a picture and an explanation of the itinerary.

CLICK HERE TO SEE THE MAP!

I hope you’ll check out all the info about the tour and plan to join us!

Tell me what you think: Have you been to Israel? How did it affect you? To leave a comment, just click here.

I’m excited to teach at the Marathon Adult Fellowship at Stonebriar Community Church on the subject of “Waiting on God with Joseph.” Cathy and I attend this class each Sunday and enjoy the fellowship and the teaching of Dr. Stanley Toussaint.

Join us if you can!

Date: November 9, 2014
Time: 10:45 am - 12:00 pm
Event: Marathon Adult Fellowship at Stonebriar Community Church
Topic: Waiting on God with Joseph
Sponsor: Marathon Adult Fellowship
Venue: Stonebriar Community Church
469.252.5200
Location: 4801 Legendary Drive
Frisco, TX 75034
USA

You can listen to the teaching here after the date.

How Do We Know What Books Go in Our Old Testament?

How do we know what books of the Old Testament were truly inspired? Although we might take it for granted, the contents of the Old Testament canon have been debated for a long time.

How Do We Know What Books Go in Our Old Testament?

(Photo: By Naval History & Heritage Command from Washington, DC, USA. CC-BY-2.0, via Wikimedia Commons)

The term canon is from a Greek word that means a “rule or “standard,” and it came to represent truth revealed in Scripture.1 For different Christians in different churches, however, the canon represented different books.

  • Some people held that the canon extended to encompass all the books read in the church for edification, which would include what is known as the Apocrypha and sometimes even the Pseudepigrapha (a collection of anonymous, apocalyptic writings).
  • Others held that the canon represented simply the Jewish Bible, which corresponds to the Protestant Bible of today.2
  • In 1546, when the Council of Trent made a formal statement that all who did not accept selected Apocryphal writings should be condemned, Protestants responded with an equally resolute voice.

This disagreement continues. However, it is an issue that needs resolution, for as the theologian Roger Beckwith aptly states, “With no canon there is no Bible.”3

So, how do we know what books go in our Old Testament?

Click to continue reading »

Maxwell Leadership Bible

Maxwell Leadership Bible (Nashville: Thomas Nelson, 2014)

When I first began reading through this Bible, I thought the content would show itself as simple rehash from Maxwell’s other books. Well, if it is, it’s amazingly relevant.

Seeing these truths in the context of Scripture gives them a better framework for application than they might find in any other book.

Maxwell explains:

My goal in creating this Leadership Bible is to enable you to raise the “lid” on your own effectiveness. I want you to reach your potential in Christ! To become more Christlike you need to think and act more like a leader. You must become a person of influence.

Scattered throughout are lessons of leadership, which are often only lessons of character that every Christian should aspire to.

Jesus said, “I am the gate.” In using this metaphor, the Lord drew upon a practice shepherds did that they still do today.

Using either a rock wall or a cave, the shepherd leads his sheep into the pen with a narrow opening of rocks for passage. The pen offers shelter and security for his flock. By staying in the narrow gap, the shepherd serves as the “gate”—the only way in or out of pen.

I am the gate; whoever enters through me will be saved. He will come in and go out, and find pasture. —John 10:9–10

Jesus also drew upon the occasion to show that once a person is saved, he or she can never lose that salvation:

My sheep listen to my voice; I know them, and they follow me. I give them eternal life, and they shall never perish; no one can snatch them out of my hand. My Father, who has given them to me, is greater than all; no one can snatch them out of my Father’s hand. I and the Father are one. —John 10:27–30

What a comforting promise from one who is no less than God!

Tell me what you think: What do you like most about Jesus’ metaphor? To leave a comment, just click here.